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Visitor Center

Moore

Cities and Towns in Moore County

Moore County political parties

Democrat
Republican
Libertarian

Schools

Sandhills Community College

 

 

3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, NC 28374
910.692.6185
800.338.3944
FAX: 910.695.1823



Public Schools K-12

 

Aberdeen Elementary School
503 Sandhills Blvd N

Aberdeen, NC 28315

(910) 944-1124

District: Moore County Schools

 

Aberdeen Primary
School

310 Keyser St

Aberdeen, NC 28315

(910) 944-1523

District: Moore County Schools

 

Academy Heights Elementary

143 Douglas Street

Pinehurst, NC 28374

(910) 295-5610

District: Moore County Schools

 

Cameron Elementary School
2636 Nc Hwy
24 27

Cameron, NC 28326

(910) 245-7814

District: Moore County Schools

 

Carthage Elementary School

312 Rockingham St

Carthage, NC 28327

(910) 947-2781

 

Elise Middle School
180 North Broad St
.

Robbins, NC 27325

(910) 948-2421

District: Moore County Schools

 

Highfalls Elementary School
1220 Nc Hwy
22

Highfalls, NC 27259

(910) 464-3600

District: Moore County Schools

 

New Century Middle School
1577 Union Church Road

Cameron, NC 28326

(910) 947-1301

District: Moore County Schools

 

North Moore High School
1504 North Moore Rd

Robbins, NC 27325

(910) 464-3105

District: Moore County Schools

 

Pinckney Academy
160 Pinckney Road

Carthage, NC 28327

(910) 947-2603

District: Moore County Schools

 

Pinecrest High School
250 Voit Gilmore Lane

Southern Pines, NC 28387

(910) 692-6554

District: Moore County Schools

 

Pinehurst Elementary School
100 Dundee Road

Pinehurst, NC 28374

(910) 295-6969

District: Moore County Schools

 

Robbins Elementary School
268 Rushwood Rd

Robbins, NC 27325

(910) 948-2411

District: Moore County Schools

 

Sandhills-Farm Life
2201 Farm Life Rd

Carthage, NC 28327

(910) 949-2501

District: Moore County Schools

 

Southern Middle School
717 Johnson Street

Aberdeen, NC 28315

(910) 693-1550

District: Moore County Schools

 

Southern Pines Elementary School
255 S May St

Southern Pines, NC 28387

(910) 692-2357

District: Moore County Schools

 

Southern Pines
Primary School

1250 W New York Ave

Southern Pines, NC 28387

(910) 692-8659

District: Moore County Schools

 

Union Pines High
School

1981 Union Church Rd

Cameron, NC 28326

(910) 947-5511

District: Moore County Schools

 

Vass-Lakeview Elementary School
141 James Street

Vass, NC 28394

(910) 245-3444

District: Moore County Schools

 

West End Elementary School
4483 Nc Hwy
211

West End, NC 27376

(910) 673-6691

District: Moore County Schools

 

West Pine Middle
School

144 Archie Road

West End, NC 27376

(910) 673-1464

District: Moore County Schools

 

Westmoore Elementary School
2159 Nc Hwy
705

Seagrove, NC 27341

(910) 464-3401

District: Moore County Schools

 

 

Private Schools K-12

 

The O'Neal School 

(910) 692-6920

 

Sandhills Classical Christian School

(910) 695-1874

 

Episcopal Day School

(910) 692-3492

 

Calvary Christian
School

(910) 692-8311

 

Pope John Paul II Catholic School

(910) 692-6241

 

Stars Charter School

(910) 695-1004

 

Highland Christian Academy

(910) 695-0494

 

Calvary Bible Institute

(910) 692-8311

 

Bethesda Link School Program

(910) 944-7450

 

Solid Rock Christian School

(910) 944-2099 

 

Churches

Acorn
Ridge Church
 Robbins

Alston Chapel  Bear Creek

Ashley Heights Baptist Church
10351 Aberdeen Road
Aberdeen, NC  28315
Office: 910-944-1952
Website:  AshleyHeightsBaptistChurch.org


Bascoms Chapel  Spies


Bear
Creek Church
 Robbins


Bellview
Church
 Robbins


Bensalem
Church
 Candor


Bethel
Church
  
Spies


Bethesda
Church
  
Southern Pines


Bethlehem
Church  Carthage


Beulah
Hill Church  West End


Big Oak Church  Candor


Bright
Light Church
 Robbins


Browns Chapel  Spies


Calvary
Church
 Robbins


Camp
Calvary Church
 Robbins


Cedar Grove Church  Zion

Grove

Central Tabernacle  Spies


Church
of God  Norman


Collins Chapel  Robbins


Community
Church
 Spies


Cool
Springs Church
 Putnam


Creek Grove Church  Zion

Grove

Crossroads Church  Robbins


Culdee
Church
 Southern Pines


Cypress
Church
 Lobelia


Deep
Creek Church  West End


Doubs Chapel  Carthage


Dover
Church
 Spies


Eureka
Church  Carthage


Fair
Promise Church
 Putnam


Fairview
Church  Carthage


First Presbyterian Church  Carthage


Flint
Hill Church
 Candor


Flint
Hill Church
 Robbins


Friends
Church
 Robbins


Friendship
Church
 Putnam


Frys Chapel  Lobelia


Green
Grove Church
 Murchisontown


Guiding Light Temple  Spies


Halls
Church
 Vass


High Falls Church  Robbins


Hood Chapel  Vass


Horseshoe Church  White Hill


Ingram
Branch Church  Carthage


Jackson
Springs Presbyterian Church  West End


Lamn
Grove Church
 Vass


Leaks
Grove Church
 Candor


Little Oak Church  Spies


Longleaf
Church
 Spies


Love
Grove Church
 Southern Pines


Love Grove Church  Zion Grove


Macedonia
Church
 Hoffman


Marshel Chapel  Norman


McDonalds Chapel  West End


Mount Carmel Church  Zion
Grove


Mount Olive Church  Carthage


Mount Pleasant
Church
 Lobelia


Mount
Zion Church
 Vass


Mount
Zion Church
 Spies


Needhams
Grove Church
 Erect


New Bensalem Church  Bear Creek


New Bethel Church  Hoffman


New Home Church  Niagara


New Hope
Church
 Robbins


New Zion Church  Robbins


Oak Ridge
Church
 Lobelia


Pine
Grove Church
 Spies


Pine Mountain Church  Bear Creek


Piney Wood Church  Murchisontown


Pleasant Hill
Church  Niagara


Pleasant Hill
Church
 Robbins


Pleasant View Church  Robbins


Poplar
Springs Church
 Pinebluff


Priest
Hill Church  Carthage


Prosperity
Church
 Putnam


Providence
Chapel  Spies


Providence
Church  Norman


Red Branch Church  White Hill


Red
Hill Church
 Vass


Reives Chapel  Putnam


Rock Hill
Church
 Robbins


Roseland
Church  West End


Rosendale
Church  Niagara


Sacred Heart Catholic Church Pinehurst

Saint Anthony of Padua Catholic Church
Southern Pines

Saint Johns
Church  Carthage


Saint Matthews Church  Southern Pines


Saint Peters
Church
 Southern Pines

San Juan Diego Catholic Church, Robbins

Smyrna
Church
 Robbins


Stones Chapel  Vass


Taylor
Memorial Church
 Hoffman


Union Church  Vass


Union
Grove Church
 Erect


Unity
Grove Church
 Robbins


West End Presbyterian Church  West End

 

Note on Churches:  North Carolina is blessed to boast hundreds of churches in every county.  We make every effort to list each church in each county.  If your church is not listed in our directory, please let us know.

The History of Moore County

Archaeological findings indicate that Indians of the Siouan family inhabited the area that is now Moore County from as early as the beginning of the sixth century, until about 400 years ago. They hunted and camped throughout the area and, in places, settled in villages. A well-used Indian trail, which crosses the County, is thought to have first been beaten out by buffaloes on their annual migrations from the piedmont to the coastal marshes. This trail, which later came to be known as the Yadkin Road, played an important role in the early settlement of Moore County.

The earliest European settlers came to the region about 1739. During the ensuing years, additional settlers, largely English, Ulster Scots, and Germans moved into the area, traveling down the "Great Wagon Road" from Pennsylvania or up the Cape Fear River Valley from Wilmington. Most settled on the fertile lands of the "clay country" along the Deep River in northern Moore County. By the mid-1750's, the area was sparsely, but evenly settled.

The next twenty years saw a large influx of settlers, particularly Highland Scots, who immigrated to the colonies to escape the harsh economic and political conditions, which existed in Scotland at the time. These Highlanders settled in the Sandhills of the southeast, an area bypassed by earlier settlers due to the poorness of the soil. The industrious Scots, making the best of what they had, soon established the manufacture of naval stores as a major industry of the vast forests of longleaf pines.

The American Revolution curtailed the influx of settlers to the area and set the stage for bitter conflict. The Highlanders, who had taken an oath of allegiance to the King of England before leaving Scotland, remained loyal to the British throne; settlers in the "clay country" supported independence. Although no major battles were fought in Moore County, the guerrilla warfare between the two factions was bloody. The Highlanders paid dearly for their political views after the defeat of the British, facing the scorn of their neighbors, and in some cases, confiscation of their property and exile from the State.

In 1783, shortly after the end of the American Revolution, Moore, until that time a part of Cumberland, officially became a County. The new County was named for Alfred Moore of Brunswick, a famous militia colonel in the Revolution, and later a Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States. The citizens quickly set about establishing their government. As the area recovered from the disrupting effects of the war and began to prosper, some schools were built and several industries flourished in the North, including a gun factory in Robbins and a carriage factory in Carthage. The Sandhills area continued to lag behind.

The Civil War put an end to all progress, as every able-bodied man went to war. After the war, Moore County had a long struggle to recovery. But, in the 1870's, the Raleigh and Augusta Railroad came through the Sandhills, providing a means to ship the products of the pine forests. Little towns sprang up every ten miles or so along the line to serve as shipping points.

During the 1880's, yet another industry developed in Sandhills. At that time, there were a number of human ailments for which the only treatment was fresh air and mineral water. The area had an abundance of both, and plenty of cheap land. Town sites were laid out up and down the rail line. Soon, people wishing to improve their health or seeking "refuge from the northern blizzard" began to flock to the resort towns. Shaw's Ridge, later incorporated as Southern Pines, became the most popular. Several years later, in 1895, Pinehurst was built; a complete resort village with an elegant inn, electricity, and a telephone system.

Moore County is in the south central region of the State and is bordered by Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Scotland, Richmond, Montgomery, Randolph, Chatham, and Lee counties. The present area is 705.49 square miles or 451,514 acres. The population is in excess of 69,502 citizens.

FORM OF GOVERNMENT
Prior to the American Revolutionary War, North Carolina depended on a form of county government which was organized around a court known as the Court of Pleas, with three Justices that governed the County with judicial and administrative responsibilities.

The Court of Pleas appointed the Sheriff, Coroner, Register of Deeds, County Attorney, Clerk of Court, County Treasurer, Surveyor, and Warden of the Poor. The Justices also heard all civil and criminal cases that did not involve capital punishment.

In other words, the County was a self-contained political unit with no townships and no citizen control over what the Court did in terms of the government.

In 1868, the North Carolina Constitution was rewritten and the functions of county government were divided between the Superior Court and a Board of County Commissioners composed of five members elected by the citizens. Over the years, various changes were made concerning the responsibilities given to the Commissioners until in 1905, the people finally were given direct control over the Commissioners in all counties through the ballot box. Townships have no powers.

"Except as otherwise directed by law, each power, right, duty, function, privilege and
immunity of the County shall be exercised by the Board of Commissioners as provided
by the laws of the State; and if a power is not conferred by the State, the power or
responsibility shall be carried into execution as provided by ordinance or resolution of
The Board of Commissioners."

Moore County Government is now formed as State law dictates. The Commissioners, Sheriff and Register of Deeds are elected. There is a Board of Elections, Board of Education, Board of Health, Board of Social Services and an Alcoholic Beverage Control Board that are formed under State Statute. The County Manager, Clerk to the Board, County Attorney and Tax Administrator are appointed directly by the Board of Commissioners. All other departments, agencies and offices that are directly under the administrative jurisdiction of the Board are organized as the Board sees fit. The Board also appoints various committees that serve at the pleasure of the Board.
The County of Moore is governed by a five member Board of Commissioners elected in a partisan election by qualified voters of the entire County for overlapping four-year terms of office. The elections are held in November of even-numbered years and the Board is formed on the first Monday of December.

Moore County has adopted the County Manager Administrative Plan, which entails the appointment of a County Manager to serve at the pleasure of the Board of Commissioners. The Manager is the Chief Administrator of county government, with responsibility for the daily administration of all departments of government under the Board's general control, with State statutory powers and duties.

The Board of Commissioners appoints a Clerk to the Board to perform all duties that are required by State law or the Board. The Clerk to the Board is a public officer that serves at the pleasure of the Board of Commissioners. The Clerk's Office helps to provide stability and also serves as a central resource office where the public may obtain information regarding Board actions and services or functions of county government.

The County of Moore exercises its powers and discharges its responsibilities through the Board of Commissioners; through the use of ordinances, resolutions, and orders, so long as these directives and regulations are not reserved as powers of the State.

The County is divided into ten townships for historical and administrative purposes with no legal or governmental authorities. The townships, with corresponding square miles, are as follows: Bensalem, 97.48; Carthage, 98.14; Deep River, 43.16; Greenwood, 44.95; Little River, 33.72; Mineral Springs, 101.33; McNeill, 76.68; Ritter, 54.24; Sandhills, 81.74; and Sheffield, 74.05.

THE HISTORIC COURTHOUSE
The present Historic Courthouse, built in 1922 in Carthage, is the most recent Governmental Administration Building in a line of three previous courthouses.

According to various historical accounts, court proceedings were first held in Kenchion Kitchen's home, beginning in August of 1784, and in the homes of other area residents. The first courthouse was constructed in 1785, southwest of the present Historic Courthouse, and was described as "a rather crude log building, small in size", that was moved to the present Historic Courthouse site in 1814. In 1820, this log structure was replaced by "a two-story wood structure, which was built high above the ground, with the space beneath the building used as a market place." In 1840, a two-story brick courthouse was built with four offices on the ground floor and a courtroom on the second floor. With no belfry, the Courthouse bell hung outside above the door. The bell is now displayed on the grounds of the Historic Courthouse. There was a jail cell in the courtroom where prisoners were always conveniently available to the judge.

Wade Wellman, in his book entitled The County of Moore: 1847-1947, writes that the 1840 Courthouse that stood in the central square of Carthage was "two-storied and two-chimneyed", and had been built of clay bricks from Dabney Cosby's clay pits south of Carthage to replace "the rickety wooden structure."

On September 5, 1889, the brick Courthouse burned. Meade Seawell's book entitled Edgehill Entry: Tale of a Tarheel Town, relates the editor of The Carthage Blade's description of the disaster. Editor Matthew Cagle laments that, not only were the 1889 tax books and records of the County Superintendent's Office lost, but the County records for over 100 years were destroyed by fire. According to Seawell, the ropes to the well buckets had been cut by the fire and the buckets were down in the well.

Wellman writes that the wooden portions of this building burned, but "within the walls of the Old Courthouse, built of locally molded brick, a new set of offices and doors were built and ready by the fall of the next year." According to Wellman, "the Old Courthouse was far outgrown and outdated. It was botched together of the brick and stone salvaged from the one that had burned down in 1889." Judge William J. Adams described the reconstructed Courthouse as "an uncertain composite of the old and the new."

A $150,000 bond issue was passed, and on January 16, 1922, construction began on the present Historic Courthouse. The cornerstone was laid in August and the present building, constructed of Indiana Limestone, wad dedicated on September 17, 1923.

A June 27, 1922, editorial in the Moore County News stated, "more and more each year, people drop into Moore County, and the stranger is impressed by the exhibits that meet the eye. The Courthouse was not an awakener of much enthusiasm. . . a County with efficiency written on its public buildings makes a hit. The Old Courthouse was a drag. The new one (present) is an advance agent of enterprise."

When the present Historic Courthouse was finished, it was also described as "crowning the dominating ridge, visible against the blue-haze of the pines over the rolling Sandhills country; the Moore County Courthouse, glistening white in the brilliant Carolina sunshine is a significant exponent of the new age of peace, progress, prosperity, and plenty of our beloved Sandhills. . . ."

The new building housed offices for the Register of Deeds, County Commissioners, County Clerk, Sheriff, Superintendent of Schools, Home Economic Demonstrator and a lounge.

On the second floor was the courtroom and separate rooms for two petit juries, grand jury, judge, solicitor, attorney and witnesses.

There were 364 chairs facing the polished wood judge's bar, and on the third story were two large rooms for the Road Commissioners and Farm Demonstrator. On the third floor, overlooking the Courtroom, there was a gallery.

In 1979, the Old Courthouse was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places.
In keeping with the previously mentioned editorial in the Moore County News of June 27, 1922, which stated that "a County with efficiency written on its public buildings makes a hit", the Historic Courthouse underwent a renovation process in 1988.


In conjunction with the North Carolina Division of Archives and History, the interior was freshly painted, doors and brass were stripped of paint and restored to the original 1922 finish. This revitalization was continued on the exterior by professionally trimming the four stately oaks, and by establishing a previously non-existent lawn with plantings of holly, azaleas, flowers and native plants.

This renovation and attention to historical detail will continue as a symbol of the pride, service, efficiency, vibrancy and strength of the County of Moore.

In order to bring the Historic Courthouse into compliance with the Federal Americans with Disabilities Act, the County began work on additional renovations to the facility. Renovation projects began during the Fall of 1999, with the construction of a handicap ramp on the exterior of the building, followed by improvements to the public restrooms in the basement, making them handicapped accessible. On April 4, 2000, demolition began inside the Courthouse, for the installation of a Dover Oildraulic four-stop elevator. The elevator was completed and serviceable in December 2000.

- Source: http://www.moorecountync.gov/main/page.asp?rec=/pages/AboutMooreCounty/historical_outline.htm

_____________________

More Information

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 74,769 people, 30,713 households, and 21,959 families residing in the county. The population density was 107 people per square mile (41/km²). There were 35,151 housing units at an average density of 50 per square mile (19/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 80.25% White, 15.50% Black or African American, 0.68% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.20% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. 3.99% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

By 2005 78.0% of the county population was non-Hispanic whites. 5.1% of the population was Latino. 14.8% of the population was African-American.

There were 30,713 households out of which 26.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.10% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.50% were non-families. 24.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the county the population was spread out with 22.10% under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 25.80% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 21.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 93.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $41,240, and the median income for a family was $48,492. Males had a median income of $31,260 versus $23,526 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,377. About 8.00% of families and 11.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.60% of those under age 18 and 10.10% of those age 65 or over.

- Source: Wikipedia



Sandhills' Farmers Green Market
Every Wednesday through August 5
3-6 pm
Sandhills Community College
Aristotle Parking Lot
Fresh local fruit, vegetables, jams and jellies, custom-made
furniture, garden and house plants.

___________________________


Malcolm Blue Farm



 
A trip down the old Pee Dee Road (now Bethesda Road) to the Malcolm McMillan Blue farmstead is a trip back in time to the days the Sandhills area was known as “the Pine Barrens.” Taking a tour of the 1825 farmhouse and museum provides insight into the lives of early pioneers in the Sandhills. The house is filled with authentic furnishings of everyday life during the 1800s. Visitors get a first-hand feel for what life in the 1800s was about by touring the farmstead. The grounds are shaded with 100-year old Darlington oaks and are composed of a windmill, gristmill, water well and numerous barns.

Malcolm Blue Farm hosts four annual events: the Down-on-the-Farm Fish Fry in April; the Bluegrass Festival in June; the Malcolm Blue Historical Crafts and Farmskills Festival (which starts on the last Friday in September, see video of the 2008 festival); and an Early American Christmas held the second Saturday in December.

The 7.5-acre farm is the site of one of the largest and most popular traditional festivals in the region. The Malcolm Blue Historical Crafts and Farmskills Festival is held annually the last weekend of September. Approximately 1,500 school children visit the farm during School Children’s Day each year to learn what daily life and work was like in the 19th century. Some of the crafts and skills demonstrated are pottery, basket weaving, woodworking, blacksmithing, spinning, weaving, and soap and candle making. The festival has become one of the best intergenerational events in North Carolina.

The Malcolm Blue Farm is a Community Heritage Project, certified by the Regional History Sites Program of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. The Society received the Governor’s “Take Pride in North Carolina” Award in 1995, the only group in the state to be so honored. The farm and museum have been designated by the North Carolina Civil War Tourism Council as part of the North Carolina Civil War Theme Trails and the National Civil War Trails. The 1825 farmhouse is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.

A barn-style structure was built for a museum in 1986. On the first floor, exhibits have been constructed, with the assistance of the Museum of the Cape Fear, to include Scotland, Cape Fear Scottish Settlers, the Blue Family, Naval Stores, Lumbering, the Pioneer Woman, Tool Room, Farm Equipment and Agriculture. On the second floor exhibits include the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad, Country Store, 19th Century Mourning Etiquette, Pottery, and both Pine Needle and Native American Crafts. There are also displays of Girl Scout and Boys and Girls Club projects completed at the farm. Finally, there is an extensive exhibit on the Battle of Monroe’s Crossroads, one of the last cavalry engagements of the Civil War, which took place eight miles from the farm.

The farm and museum are owned and operated by the Malcolm Blue Historical Society. For more information please call (910) 944-7558, Contributions may be mailed to P.O. Box 603, Aberdeen, NC 28315. Contributions are tax deductible as allowed by law.

http://malcolmbluefarm.com/index.html

Historic Carthage



Moore County Courthouse - Carthage, North Carolina

Moore County was created with the division of Cumberland County, and was officially recognized by the North Carolina Legislature on July 4th in 1784. However, the problem was there wasn’t an incorporated town to serve as the county seat, and there wasn’t a spot in which to hold court. A committee was appointed by the Legislature to come up with a site for the new county seat and a site was chosen close to the center of the county. The identity bounced between Faginsville and Carthage, but was officially changed by the State Legislature in 1814 to Carthage.

The first courthouse was constructed in 1785, until that time court was being held in Kenchion Kitchen’s home as well as the homes of the other area residents. The new courthouse was described as “a rather crude log building, small in size.” The town was not laid out until 1803 and Carthage did not become official until 1804. In 1814, the courthouse was moved to the current location of the historic courthouse at the intersection of the main avenues of Carthage. In 1820, the courthouse was replaced by a two-story wooden structure, with a space beneath to be used as a marketplace. In 1840, a two-story brick courthouse was built with four offices on the ground floor and a courtroom on the second floor. There was also a jail cell in the courtroom that allowed the prisoners to be conveniently available to the judge. On September 5th, 1889 the brick courthouse burned and over 100 years of county records were destroyed including the 1889 tax books and records.

Because of a floor collapse and several fires the courthouse was replaced five times. A bond was passed on January 16th, 1922 that allowed $150,000 for the construction of our fifth and current historical courthouse. In August the cornerstone was laid, the courthouse was constructed entirely of Indiana Limestone and was dedicated on September 17th, 1923. When the courthouse was finished it was described as “crowning the dominating ridge, visible against the blue haze of the pines over the rolling Sandhills country.” The sixth courthouse and government building was erected across the street, leaving the historic fifth courthouse in the circle. Today both the fifth and the sixth courthouses serve as government offices and court facilities.

In 1855, Alexander Kelly and Thomas Tyson founded the Tyson Jones Buggy Factory. They made the “Cadillac” of the horse-drawn buggy. The factory brought prosperity to Carthage. The buggy-manufacturing factory reached its peak in 1890, turning out about 3,000 vehicles a year. The growth in Carthage from the 1850s to the 1920s was due to the successful buggy manufacturing industry. Unfortunately, the invention of the automobile spelled doom for the buggy company.

The Buggy Festival is held each year in Carthage to honor the town’s heritage as home of one of the world’s former foremost carriage makers.

The town of Carthage boasts 1,800 residents and the National Historic District of Carthage is proud to have over fifty buildings and residences of historical significance. Carthage is one of the fastest growing towns in our county, with an 80% population increase from 1990 to 1998.


As Moore C.H., the town was granted a US Post Office on April 1, 1795, and its first Postmaster was Mr. Joseph Lea. On January 1, 1799, the US Post Office Department officially changed the name to Carthage, with Postmaster Martin Nall. It has been in continuous operation ever since.

- Source: J.D. Lewis - Little River, SC 
 http://www.carolana.com/

History of Cameron

Born of a plank road and a railroad and spurred on by the turpentine and dewberry industries, Cameron, North Carolina, prospered in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Fayetteville plank road arrived in the area in the 1850’s, and with the arrival of the railroad in 1875, a town was planned and built by people taking advantage of the opportunities the railroad offered.


Cameron was the end of the run for the Raleigh and Augusta Railroad. Entrepreneurs settled here and made a substantial living in various businesses, notably turpentine distilleries, the mercantile and hotel trades, and especially dewberry farming and consignment. The dewberry business became so successful that for many years Cameron was considered the dewberry capital of the world. Surrounded by the farmland of Moore County, the planned town developed along the main thoroughfare, Carthage Street, radiating from the railroad around which its major activities centered.

Read More


Weymouth Center

The first James Boyd, a steel and railroad magnate from Pennsylvania, came to Southern Pines around the turn of the century. He purchased twelve hundred acres and created an estate that included stables, tennis courts, gardens and a nine-hole golf course. He named it “Weymouth” because it reminded him of Weymouth in England.

His grandsons, James and Jackson, were frequent visitors. Since they were very fond of fox hunting, they founded the Moore County Hounds in 1914. After World War I they divided the original home of their grandfather. The main part was pulled by mule across Connecticut Avenue and became the Jackson Boyd home. This is now the Campbell House, home of the Arts Council of Moore County.

About 1920, the remaining portion of the original home was redesigned and enlarged by Aymar Embury II, a Princeton friend of the Boyds who became a renowned New York architect and the official architect for Princeton University. He also designed many residences and buildings in this area, including Mid Pines Resort, Market Square in Pinehurst and several buildings on Northwest Broad Street in Southern Pines. James and his wife Katharine Lamont Boyd lived in the gate house until their home was completed. It was there that he wrote and Katharine typed the manuscript for his first and most famous novel, Drums, which was published in 1925. A deluxe 1928 edition was illustrated by the famous artist N. C. Wyeth.

More: http://www.weymouthcenter.org/history/


North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame

 In ceremonies held at Weymouth Center May 18, 1996, fifteen North Carolinians were inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame, honoring their contributions to the rich literary heritage of the state. The first inductees were James Boyd, Charles W. Chesnutt, Jonathan Daniels, Inglis Fletcher, Paul Green, Bernice Kelly Harris, O. Henry, George Moses Horton, Randall Jarrell, Gerald Johnson, Guy Owen, Thad Stem, Jr., Richard Walser, Manly Wade Wellman and Thomas Wolfe. Additional members may be selected annually to join this distinguished group.

The Hall of Fame is located in the Boyd Room, former study of James Boyd, with displays of plaques, pictures, books and other memorabilia. This study was once the literary gathering place that Jonathan Daniels declared “launched the Southern Literary Renaissance” in the 1920s and 30s.

The North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame realizes a dream of the late Sam Ragan, Poet Laureate of North Carolina (1982-1996). It was authorized by joint resolution of the General Assembly in 1993 and formally established by a grant from the NC Department of Cultural Resources for the North Carolina Writers’ Network, an organization serving writers and readers across the state.

More:  http://www.weymouthcenter.org/nc-literary-hall-of-fame/

Moore County Historical Association

The Moore County Historical Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing, the rich historical legacy of the towns, cities and surrounding area, of Moore County, North Carolina.

The Association is a 501(c) (3) organization headquartered at the historic Shaw House in Southern Pines, North Carolina. It is supported by membership, donations, sales of books and gift shop merchandise, and proceeds from fundraisers. Through this support, the Association focuses on community enrichment through the presentation of exhibits at our house-museums, an educational outreach program including speakers and programs for all ages, the offering of a research library and photo archives, and hosting of special events.

http://moorehistory.com/

Bryant House


 

Bryant House, Built Circa 1820

3361 Mount Carmel Road
Carthage

James Bryant acquired the McLendon Place from his father Michael early in the 19th century with the McLendon Cabin already in place. Bryant later built the manor house there about 1820.

James Bryant's great-granddaughter, Flossie Bryant Davis and her children, gave the house with 3.4 acres to the Moore County Historical Association in 1969.

Restoration of the structure in the early 1970s included straightening of the chimneys and replacement of the shake roof.

Special features include two fine mantels, handmade doors and window sash, hand-hewn heart pine girders and sills. Neither dwelling had been altered prior to restoration and both had been continuously occupied until the 1940s.

Furnishings for the house were acquired for the Moore County Historical Association by Mrs. Ernest Ives, Mrs. John Labouisse and the Davis family.

Both the Bryant House and the McLendon Cabin were opened to the public in May 1976. Mrs. Davis, then 91 years old, attended the opening with several of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Mrs. Davis was born and grew up in the house and raised her own family of six boys and seven girls there.

The Bryant House and McLendon Cabin are open for tours May thru October 2009, on the 2nd and 4th Sunday of each month, from 2:00 to 4:00 pm, and by appointment. For more information or to arrange a special tour, please call (910) 692-2051.

http://moorehistory.com/house_museums/bryant_house.htm

Garner House


 

Garner House, Built Circa Late 1700s

Located at the Shaw House Properties
110 Morganton Road at the corner of SW Broad Street
Southern Pines

The Garner House, now on the Shaw House grounds, was originally located on the property of Mrs. Melvin Garner, off State Road 1456 north of Robbins, North Carolina.

John Garner bought the land in 1764 and his son Lewis was born on the property. The Garner House was purchased by the Moore County Historical Association in 1986.

Family members believe Lewis built the house early in the 19th century, but it is possible that John may have built it in the 1700s.

The house is unaltered and intact and is one of the finest examples of the typical rural homes of early Moore County that remains today. It is distinguished by wide heart-pine paneling with fine quality moldings at the windows and doors. The original hand-forged hinges and posts are intact.

The walls of the three rooms on the ground floor are of unpainted, hand-planed pine boards which glow with the original patina. The interior doors have early cast hinges in contrast to the forged hardware on the exterior doors.

A corner stairway with winders leads to the second floor, which features exposed log construction and a fireplace with hand-made brick.

The large pine logs forming the structure are 13 to 16 inches wide and are hewn 7 to 8 inches thick. The house measures 20 by 24 feet and has an attached 8-by-24-foot porch. The stone and brick chimney opens to a fireplace on each floor.

The first floor features the original pegged mantels with early blue paint. Much of the furniture is original to the house, including the two painted cupboards and the scrubtop table. The painted sash is also original, and some of the original glass remains on the front of the building.

The house had a separate kitchen which was too deteriorated to move.

The Shaw House properties (Shaw House, Garner House, and Sanders Cabin) are open for tours Tuesday through Friday from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, and by appointment. For more information or to arrange a special tour, please call (910) 692-2051.

http://moorehistory.com/house_museums/garner_house.htm

McLendon House


 

McLendon Cabin, Built Circa 1760

3361 Mount Carmel Road
Carthage

When Joel McLendon came to Moore County, North Carolina, in 1758, to claim his grant of 200 acres, he selected a slope overlooking Buck Creek as the perfect site for his home.

Although a simple one-room log structure, it was built with the typical integrity of the early settlers that has preserved it for over 200 years.

A little farther downstream he built and operated a grist mill on Buck Creek, which became known as McLendon's Creek, just as the road below his cabin came to be called Joel's Road.

In 1787, McLendon sold his property to Robert Graham, whose daughter married Michael Bryant, and their son James succeeded to the land. When James Bryant constructed his larger house, he built it adjoining the McLendon Cabin, where the two houses sit to this day.

The McLendon Cabin is the oldest house in Moore County on its original location. The circa 1760 structure is typical of the log dwellings built by the early settlers of the region.

The house was restored in 1970 by the Moore County Historical Association under the leadership of Mrs. Ernest Ives.

The Bryant House and McLendon Cabin are open for tours May thru October 2009, on the 2nd and 4th Sunday of each month, from 2:00 to 4:00 pm, and by appointment. For more information or to arrange a special tour, please call (910) 692-2051.

http://moorehistory.com/house_museums/mclendon_cabin.htm

Sanders Cabin


 

Sanders Cabin, Built Circa Late 1700s

Located at the Shaw House Properties
110 Morganton Road at the corner of SW Broad Street
Southern Pines

The Britt Sanders Cabin was moved to its present location on the Shaw House grounds in Southern Pines, North Carolina, from rural northern Moore County in 1952.

It was in a state of advanced deterioration with damaged logs, crumbled roof and a fallen chimney. It took love and determination to raise the money to move it and restore it.

Built in the late 1700s by Britt Sanders, whose family consisted of a wife and 10 children, it is a fine example of the early Sandhills settlers' one-room cabins.

It is of typical Scot-German construction with hewn logs and half dove-tailed notches producing a solid and durable dwelling. There were no windows in the original cabin and the floor was of red clay.

The sleeping loft upstairs is typical; the main floor provided space for living, sleeping, cooking, washing and weaving.

Notable are the sand hearth for cooking, the crusie lamp hanging by the fireplace and the antique candle molds. The old trammel by the fireplace is designed to hang inside the chimney on an iron pole, which was inserted during construction.

The loom was necessary for a family, as everything must be hand made and cloth was a precious commodity.

The beautiful chimney of native river rock is protected from the elements by a wide overhang. Chinking originally was a mixture of mud, clay and hair and had to be replaced yearly. Yards in the early Sandhills were swept clean as a daily chore, both to keep down fires and as a matter of neatness.

The entire family worked together and "recreational" activities for the children largely consisted of learning skills. It was a hard existence by our standards, but it was by no means a drab one. The family provided stability and was a cohesive factor in the life of the early settlers.

The Shaw House properties (Shaw House, Garner House, and Sanders Cabin) are open for tours Tuesday through Friday from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, and by appointment. For more information or to arrange a special tour, please call (910) 692-2051.

http://moorehistory.com/house_museums/sanders_cabin.htm

Shaw House


 

Shaw House, Built Circa 1820

110 Morganton Road at the corner of SW Broad Street
Southern Pines

The Historic Shaw House is located on its original foundation at the crossing of the famed Revolutionary Pee Dee and Morganton Roads at the southern entrance to Southern Pines, in Moore County, North Carolina.

The Pee Dee Road was an ancient Indian Trail and ran between Cheraw, South Carolina, and its northeastern settlements, while Morganton Road ran from the market town of Fayetteville, North Carolina, on the Cape Fear River.

The Shaw House is typical of the antebellum houses which followed the cabins of the early Sandhills settlers. It is less elaborate than the seacoast plantations and has the charm and sturdy simplicity which was characteristic of the Scottish families who settled in this region.

The interior is highlighted by fine detail on two hand-carved fireplace mantels of unusual beauty, and by many outstanding early examples of Moore County pottery and "plain-style" pine furniture.

A wing was added to the house in the mid-1800s and a kitchen was added sometime in the 1920s.

Charles C. Shaw, a first-generation Scottish settler, acquired 2,500 acres and built the house around 1820. The date of 1842 on the chimney is thought to have been the year that the front porch and the two attached "travelers' rooms" were added.

One of his 12 children, Charles Washington Shaw, inherited the property and lived in the house, becoming the first mayor of Southern Pines in 1887. The house remained in the Shaw family until it was acquired in 1946 by the newly formed Moore County Historical Association in a grassroots effort to ensure its preservation.

The Shaw House properties (Shaw House, Garner House, and Sanders Cabin) are open for tours Tuesday through Friday from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, and by appointment. For more information or to arrange a special tour, please call (910) 692-2051.

http://moorehistory.com/house_museums/shaw_house.htm

Pinehurst Fairbarn

 

The Fair Barn was built by the Tufts family in 1917 as an exhibition hall for the Sandhills Fair, a major event held every fall from 1915 through 1925.  The building is located within the confines of the Pinehurst Harness Track, and part of the oldest continuously operating equine sports complexes in the state of North Carolina.  Many famous celebrities from that era visited Pinehurst and some, such as Annie Oakley, performed at various events held at and around The Fair Barn. 

 

 Designed by Lyman Sise, a Boston architect and Tufts' relative, it is in the Mission Style popular around 1915.  In 1932 it was partially destroyed by a tornado. After some repairs, it served as a stable for sixty years and was designated a National Historic Landmark by the United States Secretary of the interior in 1996.

 

The Pinehurst Historic Preservation Foundation was formed in the late 1990s in anticipation of the need to restore and preserve the best elements of the original village. Its first project was the restoration of The Fair Barn — restoring the exterior and installing heat, air conditioning, light and sound systems, as well as other amenities, in the interior.

www.thefairbarn.org 

Sandhills Community College Horticultural Gardens

 
Sandhills Community College was chartered on November 7, 1963. Five years later the Landscape Gardening School was initiated. In 1978 the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens became a reality with the establishment of the Ebersole Holly Garden. Over the years, additional gardens have been implemented, including the Rose Garden, the Conifer Garden, the Sir Walter Raleigh Garden, the Hillside Garden, the Fruit & Vegetable Garden, and the Desmond Native Wetland Trail Garden. Today the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens cover twenty-seven acres. They are open to the public every day of the year from dawn to sunset and offer an educational adventure to anyone with an interest in plants, nature, and design composition.

http://www.sandhills.edu/lsg/hort.html